‘These cravings are compelling and it’s difficult to ignore them’

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Ekaterina Basilaia joined Through the Cracks earlier this year just as we started to grow and I’m so glad she’s a part of this venture to follow crowdfunding in journalism around the world.

She is responsible for some of the most interesting stories we’ve ever published, like Russia Insider’s campaign (Crowdfunding propaganda?), brought to light the role of propaganda in a series of Russian crowdfunding campaigns.

Then there was her fun story about Charlie, a year-old Belgian news startup who chose to crowdfund their online magazine for reasons that go beyond money.

 

 To give our readers a better idea of who we are and why a group of journalists from around the world came together to explore this phenomenon, we’ve shared quick interviews with five simple questions.

Here is Ekaterina’s take.

Through the Cracks: Why are you a journalist?

Basilaia: I’m a journalist because I believe that there is always something to share with people and to help them understand the world. News helps me to jump into different worlds and feel cultures and there are still so many more worlds left to jump into. These cravings are compelling and it’s difficult to ignore them.

Through the Cracks: Why did you decide to become a contributor to Through the Cracks?

Basilaia: I decided to join Through the Cracks after I saw that it does its best to fill a gap in covering the events and actions that fall behind the interests of mainstream media.

Through the Cracks: When was the last time you laughed until you cried?

Basilaia: The last time I laughed until I cried was a few months ago in Lisbon on holiday with friends. We saw a man pretending to be a statue spring to life and punch a man in the street who attempted to sit on his feet. The man was creeped out and his funny face made us laugh out loud.

Through the Cracks: What are you working on right now?

Basilaia: Parallel to freelancing for Through the Cracks I’m working on my Ph.D dissertation about media.

Through the Cracks: What has surprised you about or captured your interest in crowdfunding journalism?

Basilaia: It’s a unique possibility to offer the readers the voices of alternative journalists. I work primarily on the issues that concern journalism in Eastern European and Russian media. Considering political peculiarities in the region it’s amazing to see how fast crowdfunding is gaining its foothold and how successfully journalists are able to use different crowdfunding platforms to free themselves from undesirable influences.

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Khari Johnson
Khari is founder and editor of Through the Cracks: Crowdfunding in Journalism. He also writes about bots and artificial intelligence for VentureBeat. He has built news startups in the U.S. and Europe for the last decade.

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