Some tools for storytellers in a changing media landscape

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Photo by: Business Community Net

 

Along with Through the Cracks contributor Robert Moreno, last week I attended a workshop about new digital storytelling techniques and experiments that might come into play in the future of the media industry.

The local San Diego chapter of the National Association of Hispanic Journalists (NAHJ) and Society of Professional Journalists (SPJ) brought us all together at Point Loma Nazarene University.

The tech savvy Victor Hernandez led the way. He’s director of media innovation for Banjo and a current fellow at the Donald W. Reynolds Journalism Institute at the University of Missouri. Through the Cracks Editor Khari Johnson will join Hernandez in Missouri next month to participate in the Collaboration Culture Symposium.

Social journalism tools, digital mapping software, digital image detection, and breakthroughs in mobile reporting were all on the menu.

To get a more detail look at what was presented at the San Diego Chapters’ NAHJ-SPJ digitial storytelling workshop, here is a generous slideshow shared by Hernandez with those in attendance, mostly journalists from the San Diego-Tijuana area, along with reporters from other parts of California.

Some of the noteworthy tools or information I thought were great for entrepreneurial journalists and new to me were:

  1. Banjo, a social mapping software that lets you locate events by location happening now. What makes this pretty unique is that it connects all social media chatter from Facebook, Twitter and other platforms. This is perfect for people looking for eyewitnesses on the scene for breaking news coverage.
  2. As a standalone separate from the Facebook app, the Facebook Messenger app is one of the most popular apps in the App Store. In the future it will be more like WhatsApp messaging service. This will help journalists get in touch easier with potential sources without the hassle of “friending” them or even following them.
  3. Apps like Videolicious and Steller help journalists do more video editing and storytelling on smartphones.

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Carlos Moreno
Carlos is a freelance photojournalist and part-time fashion staff photographer at Designer Studio Inc. He is based in San Diego and Tijuana, Mexico and does freelance work across California, Baja California and beyond. Carlos is the co-founder and photography / Latin America editor of Through the Cracks. He is also a photo contributor at Getty Images. When he is not taking photos, he is a photo mentor at Las Fotos Project branch of Tijuana.

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