Journalism isn’t dying, it’s evolving

Natasha Cox.

Natasha Cox is a documentary filmmaker who joined Through the Cracks staff last month. So far she has shared stories about how to fund a documentary in the United Kingdom and a doc about a punk band, austerity and “a country on the brink.”

She cares a lot about good storytelling and building bridges of understanding between people. We’re glad she’s here.

Here are five simple questions so you can get to know her better.

Through the Cracks: When was the last time you laughed until you cried?

Cox: Reminiscing with one of my oldest friends about our teenage years. That’s one of the best and most humbling experiences you can have with lifelong friends: they can tease you with stories of how you once were and they never let you forget the most embarrassing moments. They remember everything. Sometimes the tears are from laughing as much as they’re from sheer shame.

Through the Cracks: What are you working on right now?

Cox: I am currently finishing the second series of a documentary for the BBC called, ‘Our School’. I have been producing it for almost a year and am thrilled with the results. It is due to be broadcast in February 2016.

Through the Cracks: What has surprised you about or captured your interest in crowdfunding journalism?

Cox: It democratizes journalism in an unprecedented and welcomed way, breathing fresh air into the industry. And it pleases me that journalism – online and in print – can continue to evolve with crowdfunding. Just when we thought journalism was dead.

Why are you a journalist or photographer or generally awesome person?

Cox: I suppose being a documentary filmmaker requires similar talents and interests to being a journalist, in that I have always wanted to change perceptions through human stories, as well as working to reveal the truth behind the myth. Writing about documentary filmmaking for Through the Cracks helps me think more about the motivations and great efforts people often go to when working on a film or story they passionately believe in. These people inspire me, so it is a privilege to have a space to write about them.

Why did you decide to become a contributor to Through the Cracks?

Cox: It is a very exciting time for crowdfunding in journalism and filmmaking and once I discovered the work Through the Cracks was doing, I was immediately keen to get involved. The articles are written with a specialized knowledge and wit that feels very different to other online sites. And I wouldn’t be surprised if Through the Cracks didn’t soon get the global attention it deserves – being the only place worth visiting to find out about media-crowdfunding.

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Khari Johnson
Khari is founder and editor of Through the Cracks: Crowdfunding in Journalism. He also writes about bots and artificial intelligence for VentureBeat. He has built news startups in the U.S. and Europe for the last decade.

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