Homicide Watch D.C. will stop watching streets of nation’s capitol in 2015

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Homicide Watch D.C., a news website devoted to telling the story of every homicide and homicide victim in Washington, D.C., will shut down at the end of the year, according to a homicidewatch.org post and Neiman Lab report.

Founded in 2010 by journalist Laura Amico and her husband Chris, the website successfully raised $47,000 two years ago to continue its work with the help of interns and student journalists, who could beat mainstream press to reporting of a homicide death. The site’s backend structure was eventually licensed to other cities.

Homicide Watch sites are active in conjunction with a partner in Boston, Trenton and Chicago, but no partner could be found in D.C., Amico explained in a letter published Wednesday on homicidewatch.org.

“While Homicide Watch D.C. has continued as a high-quality local news site, thanks in large part to our crew of very talented interns, the reality is that local news should be directed by people who live in the community,” said Amico, who took a job at the Boston Herald in 2012. Without any local owners, we have decided that it is no longer feasible to continue publishing.”

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Khari Johnson
Khari is founder and editor of Through the Cracks: Crowdfunding in Journalism. He also writes about bots and artificial intelligence for VentureBeat. He has built news startups in the U.S. and Europe for the last decade.

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